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Life that Is Truly Life


Walk with us on the path of generosity towards a life filled with joy.

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Life that Is Truly Life


Walk with us on the path of generosity towards a life filled with joy.

 

Welcome to the generosity movement

We envision a vibrant global community of givers who follow Jesus,
whose hearts are transformed, who put their generous intent into action, and who give with others. 

Some places we've gathered recently:

 

November
November
November
November
December

December
December
January
January

Valencia, Venezuela
Sydney, Australia
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Abu Dhabi, UAE
Xiamen, China
Tokyo, Japan
Seoul, Korea
Kristiansand, Norway
Taipei, Taiwan

January
January
January
January
February
February
February
February
February

Zurich, Switzerland
Dallas, US
Hsinchu, China
Shenyang, China
Johannesburg, South Africa
Bucharest, Romania
Bratislava, Slovakia
Belgrade, Serbia
Bangkok, Thailand

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Experiences


We facilitate safe conversations around the biblical message of generosity.

Experiences


We facilitate safe conversations around the biblical message of generosity.

Generosity Path will never ask you for money.  We are privately funded by a group of Christian givers.

 During our time together, we place Christ at the center and remove anxiety.  

 

We explore God’s Word, reflect, and view stories of how God has captured givers' hearts. By being together with other generous people, whom God has entrusted with much, God lifts our eyes and renews our hearts, reminding us of the joy of a life truly lived. 

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Our Stories


Lives transformed through the power of generosity.

Our Stories


Lives transformed through the power of generosity.

giving Lessons from Johan

1. Multiply Charitable Capital.

As a private equity professional, Johan thinks about money often. “My real interest is in capital,” he says. “Capital always has an agenda and I’d like the agenda to be Christ.” As he discovered the power of investment returns as CEO of various companies, he looked to integrate that with the area of charity and began to take a more sophisticated approach to giving. “Rather than giving a one-off donation,” Johan thought, “let’s make do it strategically.” He and a friend put some of their private shareholding in a charity (Tree of Life Foundation, TOL) and started investing. That brought exponential growth, increasing the amount the charity could give. After nine years and a CAGR of 70%, he says, “we have become a bit of a player in the local market. We see that we’re on to something way bigger than we imagined.” As other charities and friends learn of our success, they approach us to invest their charitable capital via TOL.

2. Wealthy Givers Need to Start with Simple Questions.

Johan’s work connects him to affluent families. He encourages them to ask big, basic questions. “The biggest questions are some of those initial ones – what does God want and who will help me with my giving?” Johan has seen the wealthy get burned by giving before adequately answering the key questions. “They give based on guilt or proposals to them or through an emotional response,” he says. “Perhaps a business acquaintance asks them, or they see a video for a charity.” Instead, Johan encourages wealthy families to be more strategic, to realize “this is how I need to plan and these are the stakes.” My personal opinion is that as Christians we are quite adept tactically but often lack a strategic component in the application of charitable capital.

3. Ask “What Do I Keep?” rather than “What Do I Give?”.

“We are all overwhelmed in South Africa with the need,” says Johan. “We have probably seven million taxpayers in a country of more than fifty million,” he says. “When you think about the charitable burden on Christian stewards, the need is overwhelming.” South Africa has no tax deductibility for faith-based work, making generosity harder—and more important. “In South Africa, we need a lot of education and teaching in that [generosity] space,” Johan says. He believes radical givers like Alan Barnhart and Tom Peters help newer givers redefine what’s possible. Currently, Johan says, “people feel good here if they give away ten percent. The JOG helps people understand that it’s not ‘what do I give?’; it’s ‘what do I keep?’”

giving Lessons from Raja and Shantha

1. Beyond the Full Tithe.

When preparing to teach about giving, Raja studied Scripture and found three tithes – two annual tithes of ten percent each, and a third tithe of ten percent every third year. “So, on an annual basis, the Jewish people actually gave 23.34 percent plus other offerings!” he says. “I know that we are not bound by the laws of the Old Testament,” Raja explains. “But if, under the law, every Jewish person gave 23.34 percent, how can I give less than that living under grace? That’s when I started increasing my giving. Not because God demands it, but because He’s generous. And then of course the joy of giving makes you increase your giving and not look at the figure!” So Raja and his wife Shantha started at 23.34% and have increased from there. “Our endeavor is to keep seeing that we can increase,” says Raja. (In India, there is no tax deductibility, making the Singhs’ generosity especially inspiring.)

2. In Vetting, Start with Accounting Transparency.

As an accountant, Raja starts with the question, “Are they transparent with their accounting?” “In India,” he says, “there are many organizations that are not. “Second, we think about spiritual needs. Material needs matter, but I believe spiritual need is more important. I focus on the needs of eternity. And, third, we leave room for God to show us other things. Maybe an evangelist or a pastor in a difficult situation or an elderly or invalid in dire need, warranting a touch of Christian love.

3. Transparency with Children.

Raja and Shantha have brought their children along on the generosity path. The next generation serves on the Singh’s family Foundation. “There are people that say small children should not know about finance matters. I don’t believe that,” says Raja. “When you share it well, they understand. Both our children, daughter and son, were deeply involved in our financial planning. Once you involve your children in your finance matters, generally, they come on board with the idea of generosity. It’s a great joy to us.